archatlas:

Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs? Aki Inomata

"In this piece I gave hermit crabs shelters that I had made for them, and if they liked my shelters, they made their shells in them. My idea for this piece first came about when I participated in the “No Man’s land” exhibition that was held in the French Embassy in Japan in 2009. This work is inspired by the fact that the land of the former French Embassy in Japan had been French until October 2009, and became Japanese for the following fifty years, before being returned to France. The same piece of land is peacefully transferred from one country to the other. These kinds of things take place without our being aware of it. On the other hand, similar events are not unrelated to us as individuals. For example, acquiring nationality, moving, and migration. The hermit crabs wearing the shelters I built for them, which imitate the architecture of various countries, appeared to be crossing various national borders. Though the body of the hermit crab is the same, according to the shell it is wearing, its appearance changes completely. It’s as if they were asking, “Who are you?””

ananasbooks:

ananasbooks:

OKAY SO RULES:

  • This ends September 1st at midnight of whatever time zone you live in, I’ll be choosing a winner the next day
  • I’ve been thinking about it and you don’t have to be following me, I want to do a giveaway, not gain dozens of followers who didn’t even want to follow me in the first place. If you checked out my blog, though, that would be extremely nice of you!
  • I’m not sure how much money I will be able to spend, so let’s say one winner gets one book, there’s a possibility there will be more than one winner. I’ll keep you updated.
  • You need to reblog this post to enter. Likes count only if you reblogged it first.
  • You can have whatever edition (that the Book Depository has) and whichever book in a series you like.
  • If you prefer any other book than the ones listed above you can say so, but it’s the theme what’s fun. But this giveaway is for you, I won’t argue.
  • I’ll be using the Book Depository so 1) your country needs to be on the list of where they ship to (they ship almost everywhere, don’t worry), 2) you need to be comfortable giving me your address, I won’t do anything creepy with it (I wouldn’t even know what to do with it, I could send you a christmas card).
  • If you have any questions just come here

GOOD LUCK GUYS AND MAY THE ODDS BE EVER IN YOUR FAVOR!

THE LAST DAY, I repeat - you’ve got the whole September 1st to enter, I will be choosing a winner on Sept 2nd.

My brother once showed me a piece of quartz that contained, he said, some trapped water older than all the seas in our world. He held it up to my ear. ‘Listen,’ he said, ‘life and no escape.’
— Anne Carson, Plainwater (via theperfumemaker)

How does one find internships? Unfortunately, many of my peers are having trouble finding science-related internships, mainly ones relating to lab work, and I myself don't know where to start.

Anonymous

sciencesoup:

Google is your friend. Get intimate with it. There are a lot of databases/lists of internships floating around, but you usually have to dig a bit to find them.

Here’s an incomplete list of ones I’ve personally taken note of. Most are in the US or the UK, and they’re mostly available to international students. There are MANY more programs open to US and EU citizens; you guys have a lot more options.

LISTS of STEM internships/programs in all fields:

Specific STEM fields:

Astronomy and Physics

Environmental Science

Australian Programs

LISTS of Science Writing Internships:

Specific Science Writing Internships

Basically, do your research, because this is a hugely incomplete list, but hopefully this gets you started.

Spread this around! My extensive Googling skills have to be good for something.

disneyconceptsandstuff:

James Lopez, a veteran Disney animator (The Lion King, Pocahontas, Paperman), is currently trying to raise money for his traditionally animated project Hullabaloo. Hullabaloo is a steampunk short film which Lopez is hoping will help save the cause of 2D animation, and possibly lead to a TV series or film. So, if you’re interested in badass steampunk ladies or traditional animation, may I recommend you give a dollar or two. Hullabaloo's IndieGogo page is over here, visit to donate and learn more! And I’ll conclude with the plot: 

Hullabaloo is the story of Veronica Daring, a brilliant young scientist who returns home from an elite finishing school to find her father—the eccentric inventor Jonathan Daring—missing without a trace! The only clue left behind points Veronica toward Daring Adventures, an abandoned amusement park used by her father to test his fantastical steam-powered inventions. There she discovers a strange girl named Jules, a fellow inventor who agrees to help Veronica in locating her missing father and discovering the secrets of his work.

Together, Veronica and Jules learn that Jonathan Daring has been kidnapped by a mysterious group of influential persons, who seek to use his latest invention for nefarious purposes. These villains are wealthy and influential and neither Veronica nor Jules can stop them openly. But determined to save her father and holding true to the family creed that technology should be used for the good of all, not the greed of some, Veronica assumes the secret identity of “Hullabaloo”, a goggled crusader who uses wits and science to combat evil and oppose the nefarious conspiracy that has taken her father.

newsweek:

It’s been over a decade since American psychologists Leaf Van Boven and Thomas Gilovich concluded that doing things makes people happier than having things. “To Do or to Have? That Is the Question” was the title of the study they published in 2003 (PDF), and it’s been cited hundreds of times since.

Many people now recognize that spending money on, say, a plane ticket for a vacation is more satisfying in the long run than purchasing a new television for the same price. But happiness studies keep evolving, and social scientists continue to find new ways of understanding precisely how our economic choices affect well-being.

A new paper, this one also co-authored by Thomas Gilovich, hones in on another difference between experiential and material purchases: how people feel before they make these purchases, when they’re simply entertaining thoughts of booking flights to the Caribbean or going to the movies, or thinking about shopping for clothing or jewelry.

Gilovich and his colleagues asked subjects to think about either an experiential or material purchase they were planning on making very soon, evaluate whether their anticipation made them feel excited or impatient, and rate the overall pleasantness of the anticipation.

The researchers also conducted a separate study in which they polled 2,226 adults on their iPhones at random times to ask whether the individuals were, in that moment, contemplating any future purchases (and if so, whether the purchase would be experiential or material, and whether they associated the thoughts with markedly pleasant, exciting, or impatient anticipatory feelings).

You Should Spend Money on Experiences, Not Things - CityLab

sinidentidades:

The racist immigrants carry disease rhetoric is nothing new. 

Perhaps we need a U.S. history lesson:

Under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the U.S. forged a program, through a series of agreements with Mexico’s PRI-dominated government, called the Bracero program. This program was used to fill in the gaps in manual labor the U.S. had after the war.

It sounds like a liberal dream: immigrants being given an opportunity to work in the “land of opportunity,” yet it was hardly that. The laborers were forced into horrible working conditions. Many died from exhaustion (often from working in the sun too long) from working in the fields picking food for the U.S. Many also suffered from disease.

The U.S. decided what was best for the issue of disease: a widespread use of a highly toxic livestock pesticide that braceros were often doused in as part of processing into the U.S.